Cavan Hills Veterinary Services

303 Hwy 7a
Cavan, ON L0A1C0

(705)944-5776

cavanhillsvet.com

Lost & Found   

On the Lost & Found pages you will find hints on what to do if you have lost or found a pet,

 

If you have FOUND a pet:

  1. First and foremost, BE SAFE. Do not approach a strange dog if you have ANY doubts about whether or not the animal is aggressive. Be warned that animals who are hurt will often bite - it is probably best to let the humane society deal with these animals. Also be aware that some dogs who seem friendly with adults are aggressive towards children and other pets. If there is ANY doubt whatsoever, call your local Humane Society to collect the animal - they are trained to deal with aggressive and injured animals.
  2. If the animal is friendly and approachable, ask around - check with your neighbors to see if anyone recognizes the animal.
  3. Usually, the pet's best chance of getting found is at the local Humane Society. If you do not wish to take the pet to the humane society, some vet hospitals will hold onto animals until owners are found.
  4. If you prefer to hold onto the animal until the owner is found, be sure to contact the following people to give the owners the best chance of finding their lost companion: All local pet hospitals, humane societies, pet stores, kennels, and groomers. Make sure to leave YOUR contact information.
  5. The more information you can give these people about the lost animal, the more likely you are to find the animal's owner. Include the following in your description: dog, cat, or other species of pet; color and markings; male or female; breed of animal (e.g., golden retriever, Siamese cat, etc.); length of fur; length of tail; whether ears stand up or are floppy; approximate size of animal; approximate age of animal, does the animal appear to be neutered; any identifying collars or tags; and where and when the animal was found.
  6. Check the animal for tags - rabies, license, address/phone number. Often you can locate the owner by the tags on the animal's collar. If the dog just has a rabies tag, the veterinary hospital whose name appears on the tag should be able to identify the owner for you.
  7. If the pet does not have tags, call the local veterinary hospital to see if they can scan the animal for a microchip - these are small computerized chips inserted under the animal's skin that contain a code that identifies the owner. Many vet hospitals and humane societies have machines that can read these codes and can then contact the owners. We advise all pet owners to make an appointment with us to have their pet micro chipped. This is a very simple procedure that can save you and your pet a lot of grief
  8. Take a picture of the animal and make posters - post them near where you found the animal, and at vet hospitals, pet stores, groomers, and boarding kennels.
  9. If someone contacts you and claims to be the owner, make sure they give a good description of the pet, or better yet, bring a picture.

If you have LOST an animal:
  

  1. Find the latest picture of your pet and make plenty of posters. Include on your poster a complete description of the pet, including dog, cat, or other species; animal's name; color and markings; male or female; breed of animal (e.g., golden retriever, Siamese cat, etc.); length of fur; length of tail; whether ears stand up or are floppy; weight of animal; age of animal, is the animal spayed or neutered; was she or he wearing any identifying collars or tags; and where and when the animal was lost.
  2. Visit the humane society immediately, and visit EVERY DAY! Many shelters will only hold a pet for 72 hours until they begin to search for a new home. Make sure to take your posters to give to the staff there. As sad as it may be, you should also check their list of animals that were brought in deceased. As difficult as it is to find your pet on those lists, you at least know that he or she is no longer out there, lost. In some cases you may also be able to recover the body or the pets ashes if you want to keep them.
  3. Visit local veterinary hospitals, groomers, pet stores, and boarding kennels. Take copies of your posters.
  4. Post the lost notices at local groceries stores and in the area that the pet was lost.